Shopping and Eating in Gothenburg, Sweden

Shopping and Eating in Gothenburg, Sweden

According to DigoPaul, Gothenburg is one of the largest cities in the country of Sweden.

Shopping in Gothenburg

Although it is not so much cheaper in Sweden than in Norway, it is still a pleasure to shop in Gothenburg defined by AbbreviationFinder. Here are many nice pedestrian streets and several large shopping centers where you will find countless shops under the same roof. The natural starting point is for many Nordstan, a huge 3 storey store with more than 180 shops, restaurants and cafes. Here is also one of Gothenburg’s tourist offices, which helps you with hotel reservations and general information. Another large shopping center is Frölunda Torg, which is located in southern Gothenburg. Here you will find over a hundred shops and ten restaurants under the same roof. If you have children, you can safely park them at Äventyrsleken, a playground for children of almost all ages.

The main shopping streets are the avenue street Avenyn and Östre Hamngatan, and the latter’s side streets and parallel streets, Torggatan, Fredsgatan, Korsgatan, Kungsgatan and Vallgatan. In Fredsgatan is Sweden’s oldest department store NK, which opened in 1902, and smaller arcades such as the City Passage, the Compass and the Arcade. The most favorite is Kungsgatan, where you will find many clothing stores and gift shops, Indiska, H&M and RockHouse, which have everything from rocker-related articles from books and CDs to calendars and children’s clothing. Here are also the sales to Swedish designers such as Gudrun Sjödén and Filippa K.

For a bit more relaxing small town atmosphere, take the course for Gothenburg’s old town Haga, which is known for its antique shops, markets, second hand shops, bookshops, handicraft shops and cafes, all located in small cozy wooden houses along the cobbled pedestrian street Haga Nygata.

The opening hours in Gothenburg are generally from 1000 to 1800 on weekdays, and to 1400 on Saturdays. Last Saturday of the month, however, many of the stores are open until 1700. Some major centers, including NK and Nordstan, also open on Sundays, from 1100 to 1700.

Unfortunately, you cannot be refunded the Swedish VAT of 20% on departure unless you are a national of a country outside the Nordic countries and the EU.

Eating in Gothenburg

Food in Gothenburg, Sweden

There are over five hundred restaurants and eateries in Gothenburg, so in this city you do not have to go hungry. Four of the restaurants currently have a star in the Michelin Guide. These restaurants called 28+, Basement, Sjömagasinet and Fund. The latter two are also open for lunch every weekday, and this is significantly less expensive than a full a la carte dinner in the evening. As it should and should for a port city, Gothenburg has a good selection of fish and shellfish. For example, try Restaurant Gabriel at the town’s fish market, Feskekörka.

Along Avenyn, eateries are located close to both sides of the street, with outdoor dining as long as the weather permits. Here you will find wine bars, French brasseries, bakeries, Spanish tapas restaurants, Scottish pubs, Hard Rock Cafe and pizzerias in addition to Japanese, Greek, Indian and American restaurants. Of course you will also find the usual fast food chains like McDonalds and Burger King.

The city’s most popular vegetarian eatery is called Sunflower and is located on Kaponjärsgatan 4 in the district of Haga. It is located near the university and here it is often full for lunch. It is open until 0100 at night and is also a pleasant place to stop in for an evening drink. For more tips on restaurants in Gothenburg, take a look at the Restaurant Guide.

Gothenburg nightlife is lively and varied, thanks to the city’s 60000 students at Scandinavia’s largest university. Most of it takes place in and around the main streets of Östra Hamngatan and Avenyn, and in the university district of Haga. There are plenty of alternatives, from Irish pubs and rock bars to trendy clubs and discos. You will find to a much greater extent than in Norway that many nightclubs take entrance fees, and have a doorman who stands ready with a clothes hanger and insists on getting your jacket and a twenty crown.

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